Casual fine dining

Bling has had its day. To a large extent, fine dining has brushed away old ways of thinking about status. Symbols such as fur coats, powerful engines and chunky jewellery have given way to confident understatement, as reflected in a relaxed, casual dress and a low-key atmosphere.

Informal is in. Restaurants today very rarely look like palace suites. Instead of crystal chandeliers and submissive service, people prefer an open, informal style – one that often dispenses with traditionally decorated tables.

‘In a restaurant, the kitchen only accounts for a fifth of the success. Much more important are the ambience and the attitude of the boss. A great restaurant is also a theatre.’

PAUL BOCUSE
FRENCH CHEF AND LEGENDARY INVENTOR OF NOUVELLE CUISINE

PLAYGROUND loves the new dress code

Chefs who create casual fine dining like to present delicacies on a nonchalant background. The easy, improvised look is cool. The message: uncomplicated but high quality. In this context, presentation on the plate is a personal statement. PLAYGROUND showcases this new casualness on a variety of platforms, from minimalist simplicity to sophisticated extravagance.

Playing at a high level  

Have you ever heard of LOFT? Probably not yet – because these sophisticated walnut presentation stands are again exclusive designs for PLAYGROUND. At the table or at a buffet, they make it possible to present food at different levels. Take advantage of LOFT and deliver a spectacle of exciting material combinations.

A theatre of pleasure

How can you present high-quality food in a new way? By focusing on its natural goodness, for instance with a platter made from silver-grey slate with a shimmering, silky finish and exciting textures. And why not a sushi board made from fine acacia as a warm counterpart?

More ideas for experimentation

Slow brew coffee –

ancient rituals rediscovered

In brew bars from Melbourne to Lisbon, handmade coffee is enjoying a revival as people find out about its benefits. Baristas compete with each another to draw out an aroma from the beans that tells of their distant origin. Who still thinks about takeaway coffee?